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Best places to watch Northern Lights in UK as spectacle could be visible AGAIN

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Best places to watch Northern Lights in UK as spectacle could be visible AGAIN

THE best places to see the Northern Lights in Britain have been revealed – for anyone who missed out on last weekend’s display.

The Aurora Borealis dazzled the country with a beautiful display of colourful lights seen across the country on Friday, including in EssexCambridgeshire and Berkshire.

Northern Lights visible above Burgh Castle Roman Ruins in Norfolk, May 12

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Northern Lights visible above Burgh Castle Roman Ruins in Norfolk, May 12Credit: Rex
The aurora borealis in the sky over St Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitley Bay, May 10

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The aurora borealis in the sky over St Mary’s Lighthouse in Whitley Bay, May 10Credit: PA

The Met Office space weather department has said there is “slight potential” of glancing the Northern Lights in northern parts of Scotland overnight on 17 May into 18 May.

But Met Office spokesman Stephen Dixon told The Sun there was “nothing in the forecast to impact Earth and put on a display like last week”.

While Britons who did not see the lights last weekend may feel left out, there may yet be time to view the phenomenon in the future – ideally the long and dark nights of winter.

Hopeful stargazers may wish to travel to these locations, when conditions allow, for a decent chance at seeing the lights within Britain.

Shetland Islands, Scotland

The Shetland Islands are closer to the North Pole than any other part of Britain, meaning it’s likely the best place to see the Northern Lights.

Longer nights and darker skies in the October to March period means a higher chance of being able to see the Aurora Borealis.

This means, for those intending to see the lights while staying within the United Kingdom, Shetland in the winter may likely be your best bet.

Bannau Brycheiniog (Brecon Beacons), South Wales

According to the National Trust, visitors to Brecon Beacons may “from time to time” be lucky enough to see the Northern Lights.

The National Park has been designated an International Dark Sky Reserve, meaning less light pollution – and a higher chance of seeing the dazzling phenomenon.

The location also boasts beautiful countryside, so even if conditions are bright and warm, visitors will still have plenty to marvel at.

Derwentwater, Cumbria

Northern Lights displays have been known to occasionally appear over the water in Derwentwater.

Dubbed the ‘Queen of the Lakes’, the area is still a beautiful spot for stargazing on clear nights, even if the Aurora Borealis is not visible.

Stackpole, Pembrokeshire

Broad Haven beach in Pembrokeshire is an ideal Dark Sky Discovery spot for watching the night sky, according to the National Trust.

It is part of the former grand estate at Stackpole.

“The car park above the beach provides a great vantage point – and the Northern Lights have been seen here in the past,” the National Trust writes on its website.

Eryri, Conwy 

Llyn Geirionydd lake, which is close to the town of Betws-y-Coed, is a favourite viewing spot among the locals.

Snow-capped peaks provide the perfect backdrop to any Northern Lights pictures.

Brancaster Staithe, Norfolk 

This area was graced with bright aurora lights in 2023.

The phenomenon appeared over the skies of seaside towns Brancaster Staithe and Happisburgh.

Salisbury, Wiltshire 

Sightings become rarer the further south you go.

But the payoff may be well worth the risk, as the lights can sometimes be seen dancing over Stonehenge in Wiltshire.

The Northern Lights are seen over Godalming, May 10

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The Northern Lights are seen over Godalming, May 10Credit: Alamy
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